How to Write an Explainer Video Script

The script is the most important part of the explainer video production process for good reason. You can have all the pretty design elements you like, mesmerising animation and a killer soundtrack, but if the script doesn’t clearly explain what you need to get across and hook the viewer in, your explainer won’t work.

Here’s a typical explainer video script that you might’ve heard:

Meet Jim. He does this job.

His life sucks because of these problems.

But now there’s This amazing product/service!

It fixes all of Jim’s problems in this innovative way and also does these other amazing things that Jim never even dreamed of. It can make your life better too.

Go to amazingproduct.com and sign up now.

Amazing Product. There is no better product.

Now, granted, this oversimplified version of a user-case scenario may sound a bit tired, and we’re not suggesting that every explainer should sound the same, but it covers all the basics and allows us a chance to examine the key elements of an explainer script.

Let’s break it up, and take a closer look:

The intro

Meet Jim. He does this job.

His life sucks because of these problems.

Straight off the bat, the viewer is given a situation which we hope he or she can identify with: she also has that problem! And she can’t wait to find out how to fix it.

The danger here is that there are often loads of problems and so it’s easy to dwell here too long, going on and on about all the pitfalls of the current way things are done. That’s not necessary. Establish the issue and move on to the solution as soon as you can. And don’t go too wild in your description of the problem! Some products simply make life easier – the world was turning long before your new pineapple peeler came on the market…

Your product

But now there’s This amazing product/service!

It fixes all of Jim’s problems in this innovative way and also does these other amazing things that Jim never even dreamed of. It can make your life better too.

Now you tell the world what you’ve got. Introduce the product or service, outline how it solves the problem, some of the key features and benefits and try to spur the viewer’s imagination of how she could use it. This is what they call your USP – your Unique Selling Proposition that will offer a unique or differentiated solution for their pain point. You’re now relatable AND likeable.

Call to action

Always, always, have a call to action. A web address, a social media handle, anything – as long as it sends the viewer somewhere once you have their attention. There’s no point identifying with them, offering a solution and then… leaving. Give them the thing they need to take the next step in using your product or service – a way to get in touch.

And keep it short! If you can say it in 1 minute, why use 2?

As long as you’ve kept your script entertaining, engaging and memorable, and give the viewer a way to take you up on your offer, your explainer video gets you 90% of the way towards converting a potential lead into a loyal client.

Vector Art Techinque

Vector Art is a technique, which means art created with vector-based programs. Vector art basically uses dots, lines, and curves. Vector programs take note of the relationship between these elements. This allows images created to vary their scale without losing quality or pixelating. In comparison, pixels lose quality when they are raised above 100% of their size.

Popular vector programs are Illustrator, Freehand, Corel Draw, and Flash. Almost everything created with these programs is considered as vector work. I say “almost” because there are exceptions to each rule. If your vector work combines vector images with raster images, I’m afraid that it is no longer a vectorial work (and consequently does not belong to the Vector Gallery).

For example: to finish your vectorial work, you think that your work is missing something, and you put it in Photoshop to give it a small texture, trying to complete it more. At that moment it is no longer a vector work, and you should upload it to “Digital art> Mixed Media”. In the same way, if you take the rasterized texture and put it in Illustrator by applying a layer style, nor would it be a vector work.

As this texture cannot be increased by over 100%, it makes your vector technically useless after raster images in original size. Do not even think that you cannot add textures to your vector work. Many of these programs come equipped with samples of detailed patterns, textured brushes, even with “Live Trace”, which as its name indicates, traces raster images and converts them into vector graphics.

Reiterating and ensuring there is no confusion, here is a list with programs generally considered as raster-based: Photoshop, Painter, MS Paint and a great free alternative, Gimp. Basically, everything created with this program is considered rasterized image. A few of these programs are able to create images with points, lines, and curves, just as a vector program would do.

The same Photoshop can make images based on vectors, however, they are usually considered “vexel” because vexel artists usually include brush strokes on their images (for hair, etc.).

Speaking of brushes. Just because you have downloaded and installed a set of brushes for Photoshop (or any other raster image program) that has the word “vector” in its title, it does NOT mean that your work is vectorial. These brushes come in various sizes, and no matter what resolution you apply them, they can never be increased above 100% of their size without losing quality.